Signatera Test For Patients | Natera
 

Knowing earlier can make a difference for your colorectal cancer

Each person’s cancer is as unique as their fingerprint. Signatera is a new blood test that is personalized to each person’s individual set of tumor mutations. Signatera can tell you earlier than traditional tests whether small amounts of cancer are left in your body and if your cancer is likely to recur. Knowing this information can help you have a more informed discussion with your doctor regarding your treatment and follow-up plans.

 

I'm fortunate that I was able to get this test done, and I'm excited that this is going to be something [that is continuing] to monitor me so that if there is a recurrence, we can catch it pretty quickly.

CaseyPatient

Discover our BESPOKE study of ctDNA-guided therapy for colorectal cancer

 

Do you want to be a part of something extraordinary? Join Natera’s BESPOKE CRC study to make a difference for individuals who, like you, have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). The study will examine the use of Signatera and the impact it has on treatment decisions for clinical outcomes in patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer. The study will enroll at least one thousand patients. Natera and its collaborators will collect data on clinical decisions, benefits, and outcomes from enrolled patients for two years. Participants may receive up to $150 dollars for their time.

Visit our Signatera BESPOKE study page to learn more about participating in the clinical study.

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How is the Signatera test performed?

 

Signatera is a blood test used for cancer detection and surveillance. It is personalized for each patient. A doctor may order Signatera along with routine follow-up exams to determine whether:

  • There are signs of cancer remaining in the body
  • Treatment (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation) is working
  • The cancer is recurring
Prospera’s published sensitivity indicates roughly 9 out of 10 patients in rejection were correctly identified | Natera

How is the Signatera test performed?

 

A one-time analysis of both blood and tissue determines your unique set of tumor mutations.

Prospera’s published sensitivity indicates roughly 9 out of 10 patients in rejection were correctly identified | Natera

The test is custom-built and personalized for you

~3x fewer rejections missed using Prospera | Natera

Signatera detects the presence or absence of cancer each time it is ordered as part of your routine follow-up blood tests.

~3x fewer rejections missed using Prospera | Natera

Shared decision-making with Dr. Axel Grothey, West Cancer Center, and patient Casey

 
Prospera’s published sensitivity indicates roughly 9 out of 10 patients in rejection were correctly identified | Natera

Understanding your Signatera test results

 

Your test results will either be positive or negative for the presence of tumor DNA in your blood. Your doctor will receive the test report and will be able to discuss your results and answer questions.

Negative Result

A negative result indicates that tumor DNA was not detected in your blood and that you are more likely to remain cancer-free if you were diagnosed with early stage cancer.

If you have metastatic cancer, a negative result may mean that your treatment was able to decrease the amount of cancer cells to undetectable levels, meaning the treatment has been effective.

Positive Result

A positive result indicates that tumor DNA has been detected in your blood and means there is higher risk for your cancer returning if you were diagnosed with early-stage cancer. Your doctor may continue to monitor your ctDNA levels to assess your tumor’s response to treatment.

IMPORTANT: Negative results may change over time. A negative Signatera result doesn’t guarantee that tumor DNA is not in your blood, or that it will never be detected in the future. This is why ongoing monitoring with the Signatera test in oncology treatment centers over the course of your cancer care, as directed by your doctor, is recommended—for early detection of residual disease

 
 

Check out our FAQ page to learn more about Signatera.

 

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