How can Anora help with suspected molar pregnancy?

 

How can testing help with suspected molar pregnancy?

Molar pregnancies can carry serious risks to the mother, including a type of cancer called gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). The detection of a molar pregnancy is crucial to your patient’s clinical management.

In Caucasian populations, molar pregnancies occur at a rate of 1/1,000, while in Southeast Asian populations, the rate is 1/125. In the US, there are 6,000 molar pregnancies each year.

Complete molar pregnancies with complete paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) have a 20% risk for GTD. Partial molar pregnancies with triploidy of paternal origin carry a 5% risk of disease. If found, GTD can be treated with chemotherapy.

Anora identifies the parental origin of triploidy. This is important because triploidy of maternal origin is not a cause of a molar pregnancy and does not put a woman at risk for GTD.

Complete molar pregnancy

Complete molar pregnancy (CMP) typically occurs when an empty egg is fertilized by a sperm that duplicates, or when an empty egg is fertilized by two sperm. This results in complete paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of all the chromosomes. Complete paternal UPD cannot be distinguished from a normal 46, XX result using other types of POC testing, such as karyotyping or array CGH.

Partial molar pregnancy

Partial molar pregnancy (PMP) occurs when a normal egg is fertilized by two sperm. This results in triploidy of paternal origin (i.e. 69,XXX or 69,XXY; paternal). Triploidy of maternal origin is not a cause of molar pregnancy.

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