Natera | Prospera - About | Natera

Introducing Prospera

Prospera is powered by highly optimized, proprietary cell-free DNA (cfDNA) technology. As part of your toolkit to watch for signs of active rejection, Prospera assesses all types of kidney transplant rejection with great precision.1

  • Simpler and less invasive than biopsy: Prospera measures the amount of donor DNA from a transplant recipient through a blood test.

  • More sensitive and specific than current assessment tools across all types of rejection:2,3,5 Serum creatinine tests are the current baseline screening standard, yet are not accurate enough for kidney transplant injury. Since then, first generation cell-free DNA technology has exhibited high variability. Prospera’s published data shows better performance than both assessment methods.

  • Up to 5x less variability than first-generation donor-derived cell-free DNA technology:1,3 Backed by our legacy and deep expertise in performing over 2 million cell-free DNA prenatal tests, Prospera exhibited a significantly tighter range in results when compared to first generation cell-free DNA tests - providing reliable, more precise information.1,3

How it works:

Developed by Natera with our trusted legacy cell-free DNA, Prospera is thoughtfully optimized to be a precise and reliable tool for early, clinically meaningful rejection assessment.1,3

 

Understanding your Prospera result

The Prospera result represents the percent of cell-free DNA in the patient’s blood that originates from the donated kidney to determine whether or not the patient may be experiencing active rejection. It may also indicate other types of renal injury.

 

 

Prospera can give two helpful insights about the health of the new kidney:

  1. Personalized cfDNA baseline: Establishing a baseline tells the patient and care team the “normal state” of the new kidney. New results are measured against this baseline.

  2. A way to track your cfDNA over time: Following the patient's dd-cfDNA levels in the future reveals the ongoing health of the new kidney.

Learn More

Tissue collection instructions

Physician Brochure
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Clinicians Guide to Results
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Indications for Use
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References

  1. Altuğ Y, Liang N, Ram R, et al. Analytical validation of a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based donor-derived cell-free DNA assay for detecting rejection in kidney transplant patients. Transplantation, 2019
  2. Sigdel TK, Archila FA, Constantin T, et al. Optimizing detection of kidney transplant injury by assessment of donor-derived cell-free DNA via massively multiplex PCR. J Clin Med. 2019;8(1):19.
  3. Grskovic M, Hiller DJ, Eubank LA, et al. Validation of a clinical-grade assay to measure donor-derived cell-free DNA in solid organ transplant recipients. J Mol Diagn. 2016;18(6):890-902.
  4. Bloom RD, Bromberg JS, Poggio ED, et al. Cell-free DNA and active rejection in kidney allografts. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017;28(7):2221-2232. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2016091034.
  5. Huang, et al. Early clinical experience using donor‐derived cell‐free DNA to detect rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Transplantation. 2019, doi: 10.1111/ajt.15289
  6. Stegall et al, Through a Glass Darkly: Seeking Clarity in Preventing Late Kidney Transplant Failure, J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015; 26 (1):20-9
  7. Lamb et al, Long-term renal allograft survival in the United States: a critical reappraisal, Am J of Transplantation. 2011; Mar;11(3):450-62.5.
  8. Organ Donation Statistics. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation. www.organdonor.gov. Published March 31, 2016.
  9. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. www.niddk.nih.gov. Published Dec. 1, 2016.

References

  1. Altuğ Y, Liang N, Ram R, et al. Analytical validation of a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based donor-derived cell-free DNA assay for detecting rejection in kidney transplant patients. Transplantation, 2019
  2. Sigdel TK, Archila FA, Constantin T, et al. Optimizing detection of kidney transplant injury by assessment of donor-derived cell-free DNA via massively multiplex PCR. J Clin Med. 2019;8(1):19.
  3. Grskovic M, Hiller DJ, Eubank LA, et al. Validation of a clinical-grade assay to measure donor-derived cell-free DNA in solid organ transplant recipients. J Mol Diagn. 2016;18(6):890-902.
  4. Bloom RD, Bromberg JS, Poggio ED, et al. Cell-free DNA and active rejection in kidney allografts. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017;28(7):2221-2232. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2016091034.
  5. Huang, et al. Early clinical experience using donor‐derived cell‐free DNA to detect rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Transplantation. 2019, doi: 10.1111/ajt.15289
  6. Stegall et al, Through a Glass Darkly: Seeking Clarity in Preventing Late Kidney Transplant Failure, J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015; 26 (1):20-9
  7. Lamb et al, Long-term renal allograft survival in the United States: a critical reappraisal, Am J of Transplantation. 2011; Mar;11(3):450-62.5.
  8. Organ Donation Statistics. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation. www.organdonor.gov. Published March 31, 2016.
  9. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. www.niddk.nih.gov. Published Dec. 1, 2016.

References

  1. Altuğ Y, Liang N, Ram R, et al. Analytical validation of a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based donor-derived cell-free DNA assay for detecting rejection in kidney transplant patients. Transplantation, 2019
  2. Sigdel TK, Archila FA, Constantin T, et al. Optimizing detection of kidney transplant injury by assessment of donor-derived cell-free DNA via massively multiplex PCR. J Clin Med. 2019;8(1):19.
  3. Grskovic M, Hiller DJ, Eubank LA, et al. Validation of a clinical-grade assay to measure donor-derived cell-free DNA in solid organ transplant recipients. J Mol Diagn. 2016;18(6):890-902.
  4. Bloom RD, Bromberg JS, Poggio ED, et al. Cell-free DNA and active rejection in kidney allografts. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017;28(7):2221-2232. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2016091034.
  5. Huang, et al. Early clinical experience using donor‐derived cell‐free DNA to detect rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Transplantation. 2019, doi: 10.1111/ajt.15289
  6. Stegall et al, Through a Glass Darkly: Seeking Clarity in Preventing Late Kidney Transplant Failure, J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015; 26 (1):20-9
  7. Lamb et al, Long-term renal allograft survival in the United States: a critical reappraisal, Am J of Transplantation. 2011; Mar;11(3):450-62.5.
  8. Organ Donation Statistics. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation. www.organdonor.gov. Published March 31, 2016.
  9. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. www.niddk.nih.gov. Published Dec. 1, 2016.

References

  1. Altuğ Y, Liang N, Ram R, et al. Analytical validation of a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based donor-derived cell-free DNA assay for detecting rejection in kidney transplant patients. Transplantation, 2019
  2. Sigdel TK, Archila FA, Constantin T, et al. Optimizing detection of kidney transplant injury by assessment of donor-derived cell-free DNA via massively multiplex PCR. J Clin Med. 2019;8(1):19.
  3. Grskovic M, Hiller DJ, Eubank LA, et al. Validation of a clinical-grade assay to measure donor-derived cell-free DNA in solid organ transplant recipients. J Mol Diagn. 2016;18(6):890-902.
  4. Bloom RD, Bromberg JS, Poggio ED, et al. Cell-free DNA and active rejection in kidney allografts. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017;28(7):2221-2232. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2016091034.
  5. Huang, et al. Early clinical experience using donor‐derived cell‐free DNA to detect rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Transplantation. 2019, doi: 10.1111/ajt.15289
  6. Stegall et al, Through a Glass Darkly: Seeking Clarity in Preventing Late Kidney Transplant Failure, J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015; 26 (1):20-9
  7. Lamb et al, Long-term renal allograft survival in the United States: a critical reappraisal, Am J of Transplantation. 2011; Mar;11(3):450-62.5.
  8. Organ Donation Statistics. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation. www.organdonor.gov. Published March 31, 2016.
  9. Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. www.niddk.nih.gov. Published Dec. 1, 2016.
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